SMART-Workshop | Brain-Culture Interfaces: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Entanglement of the Human Mind and its Cultural Environment

28 February 2019 | University of Amsterdam | Doelenzaal, University Library, Singel 425

The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers who work at the inter-section of the humanities, social sciences and cognitive neurosciences in order to systematically reflect on the ways in which we can investigate the shared boundaries – or interfaces, as we suggest to call them – between brain, body and culture. As a result of a paradigm shift in the sciences of brain and cognition in the last twenty years, human minds/brains are now seen by many as porous and intrinsically entangled with their social and cultural surroundings. This raises the conceptual and practical question how the interaction and entanglement of brain and culture can be investigated. We will explore in four panel sessions how researchers from different fields model and approach the entanglements of mind, body and culture and what the concept of brain-culture interfaces can contribute to the interdisciplinary discussion of these interactions.

Download the full programme here: Programme Brain-Culture Interfaces workshop 28 February

 

PhD Candidate (1,0 fte): Open University

Deadline: 1 March 2019

The field of Humanities at the Open University includes the disciplines of History, Art History, Philosophy and Literature. Research in Humanities is embedded in the research programs ‘The Value and the Valorization of Culture.’ The focus lies on the study of culture as a complex interaction of dynamic social processes in which values and meanings are developed and formed. Literature forms a separate section within the faculty of Humanities and Law; the staff members of this section carry out research on Western literature and offer courses on literature within the Bachelor and Master Humanities programs. In the research of the section Literary Studies, the focus so far has been on two subtopics: ‘Literature as a social and aesthetic discourse’ and ‘Cultural mediation and participation.’

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On Crime, Crowds, and the City: Poe, Dickens, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche

Amsterdam | 7 March 2019

ASCA/NICA Masterclass and Lecture by Jeremy Tambling, organized by Ben Moore

Date/Time/Location: March 7th 2019. Masterclass at 13.30-15.30 in PC Hoofthuis 6.25. Lecture at 17.00-18.00 in PC Hoofthuis 1.04.

Abstract: This event explores the relationship between crime/the criminal and the city, in relation to a range of mainly nineteenth-century authors: Poe, Dickens, Collins, George Eliot, Dostoevsky, Stevenson, but also James Joyce. The main theoretical approach is drawn from Nietzsche, and Klossowski’s readings of him, and from Freud. The masterclass and talk link crime as transgression with the idea of writing (especially writing the city) as transgressive, where writing is understood as an attempt to produce the ‘new word’ that Raskolnikov speaks of when justifying crime and transgression in Crime and Punishment. Baudelaire’s prose poems and Joyce’s writing are taken to be examples of this new word, or movements towards it, which exerts a price in the case of Joyce, as seen in the arguments raised about schizophrenia in his writing. Conceptualisations of criminality in the writers mentioned above are compared to Nietzsche on the pale criminal from Zarathustra, and what Freud discusses when he thinks of ‘criminals from a sense of guilt’. In both cases, questions of identity are at the heart of the discussion: crime as fixing identity; crime as escape from rationalising forces which define what the subject is.

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Memory and Activism (Mnemonics Summer School)

Utrecht | 18-20 September 2019

The annual Mnemonics Summer School serves as an interactive forum in which junior and senior memory scholars meet in an informal and convivial setting to discuss each other’s work and to reflect on new developments in the field of memory studies. The aim is to help PhD students refine their research questions, strengthen the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of their projects, and gain further insight into current trends in memory scholarship.

Deadline for applications: 1 March 2019

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Workshop ‘Performance Historiography: Examining Past Performances from a Present-day Perspective’

Ghent University | 12-13 September 2019

The interdisciplinary research groups THALIA and GEMS organise a workshop for early career researchers on the theme of performance historiography, considering theatre, music, rituals, religious processions, political demonstrations and other forms of performances in the past. Whereas the existing body of literature on such historical performances is rather anecdotal and tends to approach them through/as merely written sources, this workshop intends to consider them as experiences that are bodily and emotional events. We aim to explore how contemporary theory can help us understand their function in historical time and space.

During this two-day workshop, participants will have the unique opportunity to discuss questions on methodology or specific case studies with specialists in the field. Jane Davidson (University of Melbourne), Morag Josephine Grant (University of Edinburgh) and Henry Turner (Rutgers University) will each give a lecture and provide feedback on the work of the participating young researchers.

We encourage PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers and advanced master students from various disciplines such as theatre and literary studies, musicology, media studies, cultural history, (early) modern history, political science, and anthropology to subscribe to the workshop by sending us a short note on how the theme of this workshop relates to their own research interests by March 15th.

Please find more information about the speakers and the preliminary set-up and program here. If you have any questions or remarks, do let us know. We look forward to receiving your application!

Best regards on behalf of THALIA and GEMS,

Sarah Adams, Kornee van der Haven, Renée Vulto

Call for Papers UU Humanities Graduate Conference 2019

Utrecht | 11-12 April 2019

The next Utrecht University Humanities Graduate Conference will take place on 11 and 12 April 2019.

This annual conference is organized by and for research-oriented R(Ma) students and PhD candidates from all (sub)disciplines of the humanities from both Dutch research institutions and comparable research institutions abroad.

For this year’s edition What’s the Point?,  we invite contributions from R(Ma)’s and PhD’s from all these disciplines on the twinned issues of Impact and the Future of the Humanities.  Prospective contributors should send a 200-300 word abstract with a short biography to whatsthepoint@uu.nl by 15 February 2019.

For full details of the Call for Papers: https://hgsc.sites.uu.nl/call-for-papers/

For general information on the conference: https://hgsc.sites.uu.nl/

Contact us: https://hgsc.sites.uu.nl/contact/ or whatsthepoint@uu.nl.

Registration Open Winter School “Imagining Southern Europe: Culture & Populism” 2019 (University of Groningen and University of Valencia)

Southern European countries such as Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece face common social, cultural and economic challenges. These challenges require profound analysis and evaluation. The central questions on which this Winter School will focus depart from the hypothesis that the 2008 financial crisis and its particular manifestation in Southern European countries has revealed historical processes of interrelation and interdependence in the region that have developed since Early Modernity.

The aim of the winter school is to analyse these processes based on cultural representations (through individual and collective imaginaries) of symbolic capital exchanges and power relationships. This edition central theme is culture and populism in Southern Europe.

Key-questions addressed in this Winter School include the following: How meaningful is it to speak of a common “European” culture, history or public space? How has it been formulated in the past and how should such a concept be formulated? How has the circulation of knowledge (in media, research, publishing practices, intellectual and education networks) contributed to or challenged European integration? How do various European spaces and identities make use of the media and systems of representation? Are representations of Europe mainly created by Northern/continental Europe? How do Southern Europe citizens contribute to and participate in a European public space? How can multiple disparate histories and cultures be integrated into a notion of national or “European” identities?

More info, click here

Dates and location18 – 22 February 2019, Valencia, Spain
Fees€ 100
LevelMA/PhD/Post Doc
CoordinatorsProf. Dr. Pablo Valdivia
Dr. Manuel de la Fuente
Contactimagine.europe@rug.nl

Writing In, Writing Out: Historicizing Agency, Mobility and Positionality (Call for Papers: PhD Workshop, Åbo Akademi University)

25 April 2019 | Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland

Call for Papers: PhD Workshop organised in conjunction with the Åbo Akademi’s annual seminar in the minority research taking place on April 25th. The annual seminar of the Åbo Akademi University minority research profile will explore histories and historiographies of minority positions. It will trace practices of exclusion and inclusion, agency and mobility through archives and the materialities of class, race, body, gender and religion. How, what and whose stories are being told and untold – and by whom? How can they be told otherwise? Read more

Symposium ‘The Negotiation of Values in Narrative’

Groningen, 31 January 2019

The University of Groningen would like to invite you to the Symposium “The Negotiation of Values in Narrative,” which will be held on 31 January 2019 in the Doopsgezinde Kerk, Groningen. The Symposium is organised in honour of prof. dr. Liesbeth Korthals Altes, who will retire from the academy, and offers a platform to eminent scholars in the field of narrative.
For more information about the programme, go to https://narrativevalues.blogspot.com/
Tickets can be orderd via the website or the university webshop:

Call for participants: CETRA Summer School 2019

CETRA Summer School 2019, 31st Research Summer School
University of Leuven, campus Antwerp, Belgium
19 – 30 Aug 2019

CETRA Chair Professor: Jemina NAPIER – Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK

In 1989 José Lambert created a special research program in Translation Studies at the University of Leuven in order to promote research training in the study of translational phenomena and to stimulate high-level research into the cultural functions of translation. Since then, this unique program has attracted talented PhD students, postdocs and young scholars who spend two weeks of research under the supervision of a team of prominent scholars, and under the supervision of the Chair Professor, an annually appointed expert in the field of Translation Studies. From 1989 on, the program has hosted participants from Austria to Australia, from Brazil to Burundi, and from China to the Czech Republic. As an illustration of the multi-campus model of CETRA, the 2019 edition of the Summer School will be organized at the Antwerp campus of the KU Leuven, in the city center of Antwerp.

The list of CETRA professors may serve as an illustration of the program’s openness to the different currents in the international world of Translation Studies: †Gideon Toury (Tel Aviv, 1989), †Hans Vermeer (Heidelberg, 1990), Susan Bassnett (Warwick, 1991), †Albrecht Neubert (Leipzig, 1992), Daniel Gile (Paris, 1993), Mary Snell-Hornby (Vienna, 1994), †André Lefevere (Austin, 1995), Anthony Pym (Tarragona, 1996), Yves Gambier (Turku, 1997), Lawrence Venuti (Philadelphia, 1998), Andrew Chesterman (Helsinki, 1999), Christiane Nord (Magdeburg, 2000), Mona Baker (Manchester, 2001), Maria Tymoczko (Amherst, Massachusetts, 2002), Ian Mason (Edinburgh, 2003), Michael Cronin (Dublin, 2004), †Daniel Simeoni (Toronto, 2005), Harish Trivedi (Delhi, 2006), †Miriam Shlesinger (Tel Aviv, 2007), Kirsten Malmkjaer (London, 2008), †Martha Cheung (Hong Kong, 2009), Sherry Simon (Montreal, 2010), Christina Schaeffner (Aston, 2011), Franz Pöchhacker (Vienna, 2012), Michaela Wolf (Graz, 2013), Arnt Lykke Jakobsen (Copenhagen, 2014), Judy Wakabayashi (Kent, USA, 2015), Jeremy Munday (Leeds, UK, 2016), Leo Tak-hung Chan (Hong Kong, 2017), Sandra L. Halverson (Bergen, Norway, 2018).

Summer School staff

Pieter Boulogne, Elke Brems, Dirk Delabastita, Isabelle Delaere, Lieven D’hulst, Dilek Dizdar, Daniel Gile, Demi Krystallidou, Haidee Kruger, Reine Meylaerts, Franz Pöchhacker, Sara Ramos Pinto, Aline Remael, Heidi Salaets, Christina Schäffner, Leo Tak-hung Chan and Luc van Doorslaer

Basic activities and components of the Summer School

  • Public Lectures by the CETRA Professor on key topics. A preliminary reading list will be furnished and all topics are to be further developed in discussions.
  • Theoretical-methodological seminars given by the CETRA staff. Basic reading materials will be made available in advance.
  • Tutorials: individual discussions of participants’ research with the CETRA Professor and the CETRA staff.
  • Workshops in small groups according to topic or methodology.
  • Students’ papers: presentation of participants’ individual research projects followed by open discussion.
  • Publication: each participant is invited to submit an article based on the presentation, to be refereed and published in an edited volume.

Application in two rounds

First round (for early bird guarantee): application deadline: 4 March 2019
Second round: application deadline: 2 May 2019

For further information