OSL Research Day – Oct 12, 2018 (Groningen)

—NOTE: THE RESEARCH DAY IS FULLY BOOKED. If you want to be on our waiting list, you can sent an e-mail to OSL-fgw@uva.nl. Please indicate in your email in which sessions you would like to participate.—

The third OSL Research Day will take place on October 12, 2018 at the University Library in Groningen. We invite scholars from all Dutch universities to explore affinities in their research interests and possibilities for future collaboration around a number of research topics (mentioned below).

The Research Day hopes to stimulate more collaboration between literary scholars and existing research groups in the Netherlands. Although literature is the main scope of the OSL Research School, we explicitly encourage multidisciplinary research.

Programme
The Research Day will start with the presentation of the 2018 OSL Award, followed by a PhD Forum and a session on Research Funding. After a short break, Prof. dr Esther Peeren (UvA) will lecture on Reading Rural Imaginations (project awarded with an ERC Consolidator Grant). Peeren’s innovative research is closely related to various topics that will be discussed in parallel sessions during the afternoon (cf. E. Peeren. The Spectral Metaphor: Living Ghosts and the Agency of Invisibility, 2014; E. Peeren, H. Stuit, & A. van Weyenberg (Eds.), Peripheral Visions in the Globalizing Present: Spaces, Mobilities, Aesthetics, Leiden: Brill, 2016; E. Peeren, R. Celikates, J. de Kloet, & T. Poell (Eds.), Global Cultures of Contestation: Mobility, Sustainability, Aesthetics & Connectivity, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).

In the afternoon, the participants will discuss their own research projects and interests in sessions organised by existent and emerging research groups. Sessions are planned on the topics of literature and law, poetics of knowledge, literature and technology, transgressing boundaries et al. These sessions take 1.5 hour each, and are open to all researchers. These sessions can take different shapes and forms, dependent upon the ideas of the organizers and participants. A detailed programme of the afternoon sessions can be found here PROGRAMME All Sessions OSL Research Day 2018

Background readings: Session 1 (Anker & Meyler); session 3 (Moretti).

Seed Money
The organization of the sessions is flexible and is up to the convenors of each session. The sessions can be envisaged as a matchmaking event, a presentation of brief research pitches/papers or discussion in which ongoing or future research projects are presented. We would explicitly like to invite participants to think about future collaborations with other OSL members. The OSL Board will make € 1000,- of seed money available for the most promising initiative, including for instance:

  • planning of symposia
  • book publications
  • joint funding applications
  • organization of OSL budgeted academic events such as the Ravenstein Seminar in January 2020 (in this case, the seed money will be added as an extra to the budget already made available by OSL).

Applications (short description of the collaborative project and estimation of expenses, approx. 500 words) should be sent to the OSL office by 16 November 2018 (OSL-fgw@uva.nl). The OSL Board will notify the recipients by Dec 10.

Registration
Participants can register for the Research Day by sending an email to OSL-fgw@uva.nl  before October 8. Please indicate in your email in which sessions you would like to participate. The event will take place in the RUG University Library, Broerstraat 4, Groningen.

THE RESEARCH DAY IS FULLY BOOKED. If you want to be on our waiting list, you can sent an e-mail to OSL-fgw@uva.nl. Please indicate in your email in which sessions you would like to participate.

We look forward to meeting you all in Groningen on Oct 12!

Pablo Valdivia, Ruby de Vos, Alberto Godioli, Florian Lippert, Sander Brouwer and the OSL Board

 

 

TimeSessionVenue
10:00-10:15Coffee Reception-Welcome by Dr Stephan Besser & Prof. dr Pablo ValdiviaJantina Tammeszaal (University Library, Broerstraat 4, 4th floor)
10:15-10:30OSL AwardJantina Tammeszaal
10:30-11:30PhD Forum (Convenors: Ruby de Vos & Dr Vera Alexander)Jantina Tammeszaal

 

11:30-12:00 Life Beyond ERC & NWO: Research Funding (Presentation: Gema Ocaña RUG Senior Advisor in European Affairs / Funding)Jantina Tammeszaal
12:00-13:00LunchTBA
13:00-14:00Reading Rural Imaginations

Lecture by Prof. dr Esther Peeren (Chair: Dr. Sander Brouwer)

Jantina Tammeszaal

 

14:00-15:30Parallel Session 1: Research Group Literature & Law (Convenors: Prof. dr Sebastian Sobecki, Dr Alberto Godioli, Dr Florian Lippert)

Parallel Session 2: Tourism and Travel Cultures (Convenor: Dr Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenandar)

Parallel Session 3: Research Group Poetics of Knowledge (Convenors: Dr Marieke Winkler, Dr Stephan Besser)

Parallel Session 1- Jantina Tammeszaal

 

Parallel Session 2- Annie Nicolette Josephus Jittazaal (room 0339, University Library, Broerstraat 4, 3rd floor)

Parallel Session 3 – Room OBS 23.014 (Oude Boteringestraat 23, ground floor)

 

15:30-16:00Coffee BreakJantina Tammeszaal
16:00-17:30Parallel Session 4: Research Group Transgressing Borders: Mediating & Negotiating Cultures (Convenor: Dr Petra Broomans, Prof. dr Mathijs Sanders,  Dr Jeanette den Toonder)

Parallel Session 5: Arts and the Public Sphere (Convenors: Prof. dr Laura Bieger, Dr. Thijs Lijster, Prof. dr Margriet van der Waal, Jesse van Amelsvoort)

Parallel Session 6: Memory and Resistance in Times of Crisis (Convenors: Dr Ksenia Robbe, Prof. dr Maria Boletsi, Dr. Kasia Mika).

Parallel Session 4 – Jantina Tammeszaal

 

Parallel Session 5 – Zernikezaal, Academy Building (Broerstraat 5, main building opposite the library, 3rd floor)

Parallel Session 6 – Room A.02, Academy Building (Broerstraat 5, main building opposite the library, ground floor)

17:30-18:00BreakJantina Tammeszaal
18:00-19:00Book presentation Prof. dr Richard Lansdown, Literature and Truth: Imaginative Writing as a Medium for Ideas (Brill, December 2017)

Chair: Prof. dr Pablo Valdivia

Jantina Tammeszaal

 

 

LACE Winter School: Narrative Values, the Value of Narratives

University of Groningen
January 28 – February 1 

Since the narrative turn, the interest in the concept of narrative and its values has become widespread, both inside and outside the academy. There is a growing interest in narrative fiction as an ‘experimental values laboratory,’ studying both the value of narrative fiction in society and the values that are circulated through narrative fiction. Outside the academy, storytelling has become the focus of interest in many professional practices, such as psychology, counselling, medicine and health, and journalism, where it is used as a tool to piece together broken lives and make sense out of chaos and destruction. Narrative thus appears to be everywhere.

The Winter School, organized in affiliation with the Literature and Change in Europe (LACE) network, offers cutting-edge narratological research with contributions from leading narrative scholars, such as Jan Baetens (Leuven), Hendrik Skov Nielsen (Aarhus), Marina Grishakova (Tartu) and Liesbeth Korthals Altes (Groningen). In it, a broad array of disciplines and practices will be showcased, exploring how narratives are shaped by ethical, aesthetic, epistemological, and social values, and how narratives function as varied and complex transmitters of values in contemporary society.

Special attention will be paid to the ‘dark side’ of the omnipresence of storytelling in contemporary virtual and mediatized culture: on the impact of simple stories catching people’s imagination and spreading like wildfire and the use of stories in politics and marketing to manipulate voters and consumers. There is a need for “narrative savviness”: the ability to critically assess narratives as constructed representations of reality, rather than reality itself, and to be aware of their implies yet often hidden values.

Participants of the Winter School will follow a series of lectures and participate in interactive workshops during which they can present their research projects. Included in the programme is a day-long symposium, organized in honour of prof. dr. Korthals Altes and her contributions to the field of narrative, where additional international speakers will present their work and engage in a lively debate on the negotiation of values in and through narratives.

Please note that if your programme includes a requirement to earn credits from a national research school, the credits for this winter school do not count towards that requirement. 

More information

OSL Training Programme 2018-19

In the academic year 2018-19, OSL offers the following courses and seminars for RMa students and PhD candidates:

  • Deleuze Seminar “Matters of Life and Death” (Sept 2018-May 2019; 2 or 5 EC); RMa/PhD)
  • Seminar “Perspectives on African Literature” (Oct-Dec 2018, 5 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Seminar “Postcolonial Remembrances: Violence and Identity in Literature and Film” (Nov 2018 – Jan 2019, 5 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Schrijfcursus voor geesteswetenschappers – Framen, schrappen en herschrijven (January 7-11, 3 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Ravenstein Seminar (Winter School) “Memory Studies and Materiality” (January 23-25, 5 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Seminar “Contemporary Debates in Life Writing” (March-April, 5 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Course “Computational Literary Studies” (April-May 2019, 3 or 6 EC; RMa/PhD)
  • Hermes Summer School “Passages” (May 20-23, Giessen/Germany; PhD)
  • Seminar “Naming the World: Realism Travels the Globe” (May-June, 5 EC; RMa/PhD)

Please find more specific course descriptions on our website! Registration for most events will open in September 2018. Workshops, masterclasses etc. will be announced during the academic year.

Deleuze Seminar 2018-19 “Matters of Life and Death”

Location: Stijlkamer van Ravensteijn, Kromme Nieuwe Gracht 80, Utrecht University
Teaching period: September 2018-May 2019 (see dates below)
Time: Tuesday afternoon, 13:00-16:00
Organisers: Prof. Rosi Braidotti & dr. Rick Dolphijn (Utrecht University)
Credits: 2 or 5 EC
Registration: Open for RMa students and PhD candidates. RMa students and PhD candidates of Dutch universities have to register for this seminar via OSL, by sending an e-mail to osl-fgw@uva.nl. All other participants register directly via prof. Briadotti’s assistant: gw.braidottiass@uu.nl. In your registration please include a biographical note of up to 100 words in which you state your affiliation and motivation to participate in the seminar. Register before 7 September 2018.

 

Outline

The focus of this year’s seminar will be on Deleuze’s approach to death, pain and madness, under the combined influence of psychoanalysis, notably Melanie Klein, and the works of Maurice Blanchot and Spinoza. We will study and discuss the relationship between Deleuze’s neo-materialist, vital ethics of affirmation and its implications for complex issues around the lived experiences of pain, madness, resistance, suffering and dying. How does the neo-Spinozist notion of endurance foster the project of constructing an affirmative ethics? How can one live an affirmative ethical life and endure the pain?
Throughout his working life, Deleuze devoted spent a lot of time rethinking ‘ways to die’. This emphasis intensified towards the end of his life and was addressed explicitly in his final text. It is key to understand that Deleuze’s affirmative vitalism or his emphasis on life and joy does not mean that Deleuze’s thinking is about happiness or a search for a happy life. Enduring the pain, or living the wound, means, especially in our times, that we have to rethink issues like death, pain and madness thoroughly.
These issues are especially relevant for posthuman subjects situated between the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Sixth Extinction? In the brutal context of the Anthropocene and climate change, of rising populism, growing poverty and inequality? How does Deleuze’s ethics help us to deal affirmatively with these challenges?
To discuss these crucial issues in a balanced manner, the seminar will also look at some of the most common objections moved against affirmative ethics and try to assess them. It will also connect ideas like affirmation and endurance to the philosophical tradition of neo-stoicism, and to Deleuze’s re-reading of it.
Always starting from the active participation of all of its participants, this close reading seminar aims at making Deleuze’s ideas productive in many (unforeseen) aspects of academic research and artistic practice. This means we aim (jointly) to include your research projects in close reading. Thus, we find out how Deleuze’s take on death, madness, destruction, the Stoic tradition, the non-human and whatever we read in these texts, matters in the world today.

The seminar consists of nine sessions in English which will run throughout the academic year 2018-2019 in Utrecht. Research masters and PhD students, as well as staff members, are welcome to participate. Each session of the three-hour seminar will consist of an in-depth reading of a text by Gilles Deleuze (with or without Felix Guattari), sometimes alongside secondary texts by other theorists or philosophers.

Dates

  • 18 September 2018
  • 9 October 2018
  • 27 November 2018
  • 18 December 2018
  • 22 January 2019
  • 19 February 2019
  • 26 March 2019
  • 23 April 2019
  • 21 May 2019 (preliminary for now; Deleuze Symposium day)

Assignments

  • Attendance and active participation in at least 4 sessions and presentation during one of the sessions (2 EC)
  • Attendance and active participation in 5 sessions, presentation and paper of 2500 words (5 EC)

 

 

 

OSL Seminar – Postcolonial Remembrances: Violence and Identity in Literature and Film

Date: Nov 2018 – Jan 2019
(6 meetings: 2 November 2018, 15:00-19:00; 16 November 2018, 15:00-19:00; 23 November 2018 (15:00-19:00; 30 November 2018, 14:00-19:00; 11 January,15:00-19:00; 18 January 2018, 12:00-19:00 )
Location: University of Amsterdam, see below
Instructor: Dr Ihab Saloul
Credits: 5 EC
Registration: Open to PhD candidates and RMA students (maximum participants 15-20 students)

 

“The colonized man finds his freedom in and through violence.”
— Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth (1963:86)

The decisive role that Fanon attributes to material violence in the colonial context had an inexorable afterlife in the postcolonial world. According to Fanon, violence functions like a language in the colonial system, such that the colonised who seeks to overthrow the coloniser is only writing back in the coloniser’s own language. The texts and films we will study reflect this intersection of violation and political violence. Contrary to Fanon, however, they present it as a mutating, complex cultural phenomenon that draws its energies from multiple historical narratives and postcolonial remembrances. Postcolonial literary and audiovisual narratives, as we will see, not only locate violence in culturally specific sites and values such as shame, honour, purity and sacrifice, but they also draw their charge from the ways the corporeality or the embodied politics of “the victim” is made to stand in for the body politic. Think of the links between contemporary cases of political conflict across the world and Western colonial histories of these territories. Other examples include European experiences with the so-called “violent migrant”, and how the phenomenon of migration runs the risk of being enduringly aesthetized. Among other matters, postcolonial texts and media expose the brutalities of war, the entanglement of family dynamics in armed resistance to political oppression, the ambiguities of bearing witness to violation, and the effects of metropolitan values imposed upon poverty-stricken societies on the brink of chaos. These topics among others will be the focus of our discussion in this seminar. We will explore the historical references that postcolonial remembrances and cultural expressions adopt in the context of globalisation, and ask whether their symbolism adds or undercuts their political urgency? How does the extremity of the subject matter of these narratives and media effect their reaching beyond the conventions of realism into the realms of memory and the imagined (even the surreal, and the grotesque sometimes)? Of related interest will be the ways in which postcolonial literature and media experiment with anti-linear narrative sequences and spatiotemporal continuities of memory in order to stage an apocalyptic climax that collapses past, present and future violence.

Reading materials include Asia Djebar, Algerian White (2000);  Liyana Badr, A Balcony Over the Fakihani (1983); Santosh Sivan, The Terrorist (1998)

Objectives
The seminar’s objectives are:

  • To introduce students to postcolonial memory debates and theories in connection to literary and filmic representations of memory, violence, migration, identity and globalisation.
  • To provide students with analytical tools to deal with these concepts in postcolonial literatures and films from different historical and cultural contexts.

Instructional Format & Examination
The seminar includes lectures, tutorials, film viewings (students are expected to watch films in advance) and a mini-conference. Students are expected to:

  • Attend and actively participate in all sessions (20%)
  • Prepare a group presentation, and an Individual presentation for the mini-conference (30%)
  • 3000 word analytical report, with a focus on one or more themes of the seminar (50%)

Dates:
2 November 2018 –  15:00-19:00 – OIH D2.04
16 November 2018 – 15:00-19:00 – OIH D2.04
23 November 2018 – 15:00-19:00 – OIH E0.14B
30 November 2018 – 14:00-19:00 – UB C1.13
11 January 2019 – 15:00-19:00 – OIH E0.14B
18 January 2019 – 12:00-19:00 – OIH E0.14C 

OIH – Oost-Indisch Huis
UB – Universiteitsbibliotheek