SMART-Workshop | Brain-Culture Interfaces: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Entanglement of the Human Mind and its Cultural Environment

28 February 2019 | Amsterdam
The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers who work at the inter-section of the humanities, social sciences and cognitive neurosciences in order to systematically reflect on the ways in which we can investigate the shared boundaries – or interfaces, as we suggest to call them – between brain, body and culture. As a result of a paradigm shift in the sciences of brain and cognition in the last twenty years, human minds/brains are now seen by many as porous and intrinsically entangled with their social and cultural surroundings.

On Crime, Crowds, and the City: Poe, Dickens, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche

Amsterdam | 7 March 2019

ASCA/NICA Masterclass and Lecture by Jeremy Tambling, organized by Ben Moore

Abstract: This event explores the relationship between crime/the criminal and the city, in relation to a range of mainly nineteenth-century authors: Poe, Dickens, Collins, George Eliot, Dostoevsky, Stevenson, but also James Joyce. The main theoretical approach is drawn from Nietzsche, and Klossowski’s readings of him, and from Freud.

Workshop ‘Performance Historiography: Examining Past Performances from a Present-day Perspective’

Ghent University | 12-13 September 2019

The interdisciplinary research groups THALIA and GEMS organise a workshop for early career researchers on the theme of performance historiography, considering theatre, music, rituals, religious processions, political demonstrations and other forms of performances in the past. Whereas the existing body of literature on such historical performances is rather anecdotal and tends to approach them through/as merely written sources, this workshop intends to consider them as experiences that are bodily and emotional events. We aim to explore how contemporary theory can help us understand their function in historical time and space.

Call for Papers UU Humanities Graduate Conference 2019

Utrecht | 11-12 April 2019

The next Utrecht University Humanities Graduate Conference will take place on 11 and 12 April 2019.
This annual conference is organized by and for research-oriented R(Ma) students and PhD candidates from all (sub)disciplines of the humanities from both Dutch research institutions and comparable research institutions abroad.
For this year’s edition What’s the Point?,  we invite contributions from R(Ma)’s and PhD’s from all these disciplines on the twinned issues of Impact and the Future of the Humanities. 

Registration Open Winter School “Imagining Southern Europe: Culture & Populism” 2019 (University of Groningen and University of Valencia)

18-22 February 2019 | Valencia | Spain

Southern European countries such as Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece face common social, cultural and economic challenges. These challenges require profound analysis and evaluation. The central questions on which this Winter School will focus depart from the hypothesis that the 2008 financial crisis and its particular manifestation in Southern European countries has revealed historical processes of interrelation and interdependence in the region that have developed since Early Modernity.

The aim of the winter school is to analyse these processes based on cultural representations (through individual and collective imaginaries) of symbolic capital exchanges and power relationships. This edition central theme is culture and populism in Southern Europe.

Writing In, Writing Out: Historicizing Agency, Mobility and Positionality (Call for Papers: PhD Workshop, Åbo Akademi University)

25 April 2019 | Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland

Call for Papers: PhD Workshop organised in conjunction with the Åbo Akademi’s annual seminar in the minority research taking place on April 25th. The annual seminar of the Åbo Akademi University minority research profile will explore histories and historiographies of minority positions. It will trace practices of exclusion and inclusion, agency and mobility through archives and the materialities of class, race, body, gender and religion. How, what and whose stories are being told and untold – and by whom? How can they be told otherwise?

Symposium ‘The Negotiation of Values in Narrative’

Groningen, 31 January 2019

The University of Groningen would like to invite you to the Symposium “The Negotiation of Values in Narrative,” which will be held on 31 January 2019 in the Doopsgezinde Kerk, Groningen. The Symposium is organised in honour of prof. dr. Liesbeth Korthals Altes, who will retire from the academy, and offers a platform to eminent scholars in the field of narrative.

Call for participants: CETRA Summer School 2019

19 – 30 Aug 2019 | University of Leuven, campus Antwerp, Belgium
In 1989 José Lambert created a special research program in Translation Studies at the University of Leuven in order to promote research training in the study of translational phenomena and to stimulate high-level research into the cultural functions of translation. Since then, this unique program has attracted talented PhD students, postdocs and young scholars who spend two weeks of research under the supervision of a team of prominent scholars, and under the supervision of the Chair Professor, an annually appointed expert in the field of Translation Studies.